International Children's and Young Adult Book Exhibition

EXHIBITION June 1946 —  August 1946

On the initiative of the American military government, the International Children's and Young Adult Book Exhibition took place in Haus der Kunst shortly after the war, and was the institution's first major postwar cultural event. The show's organization was entrusted to journalist Jella Lepman, who had recently returned from exile and would establish the International Children's and Young Adult Library in Munich just a few years later. Lepman believed that promoting children's and young adult literature was important for Germany's reconstruction – which she was convinced would only succeed if the general focus was on future generations. She also believed that books were the best means with which to teach children to be open-minded, tolerant, and peaceloving. For Lepman, Haus der Kunst was the ideal place – not despite, but precisely because of its burdened past – to present more than 4,000 children's and young adult books from 14 countries. In rooms decoratively embellished with numerous children's drawings, publishers, authors, and illustrators presented their work and contributed to the valorization of children's and young adult literature and to making it part of the public consciousness. The large number of visitors young and old confirmed the objective for the historical building's future management, i.e. to "free it of its dark past through confidence, openness, and a new democratic value system." (Sabine Brantl, Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2007).

Young visitor of the "Jugendbuch" [The Young Adult's Book] exhibition, July 1946, International Youth Library

Stretch your view


Stretch your view


EXHIBITION

Bavarian Paintings from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries

Shortly after the war and the destruction of the Munich Pinakothek, it was appropriate to again make its outstanding collection available to the public. MORE


EXHIBITION

Export Trade Show

For Bavarian Minister of Economic Affairs Ludwig Erhard, the exhibition – staged shortly after Germany's war-induced collapse – was intended to demonstrate the Bavarian people's diligence, artisanal skill, and industrial know-how. MORE