Opening of the third "Great German Art Exhibition", July 16, 1939. Hitler's speech in the former "Hall of Honor" - The Bavarian State Library, Munich / Photos Hoffmann
Banquet in the former "Ehrenhalle", 1956 - Haus der Kunst, Historical Archive
International Film Exhibition in the former "Ehrenhalle", 1958 - Haus der Kunst, Historical Archive
Exhibition Utopia Station, in the former "Ehrenhalle, 2004, installation view - Photo Wilfried Petzi
Alexander Kluge, film program, December 2, 2007 - Projection on the curtains of "Shifted Room" by Petra Blaisse - Photo by Marion Vogel
Installation "Template" by Ai Weiwei, 2009 in the former "Ehrenhalle" - Photo Wilfried Petzi

Opening of the third "Great German Art Exhibition", July 16, 1939. Hitler's speech in the former "Hall of Honor" - The Bavarian State Library, Munich / Photos Hoffmann

Banquet in the former "Ehrenhalle", 1954 - Haus der Kunst, Historical Archive

International Film Exhibition in the former "Ehrenhalle", 1958 - Haus der Kunst, Historical Archive

Exhibition Utopia Station, in the former "Ehrenhalle, 2004, installation view - Photo Wilfried Petzi

Alexander Kluge, film program, December 2, 2007 - Projection on the curtains of "Shifted Room" by Petra Blaisse - Photo by Marion Vogel

Installation "Template" by Ai Weiwei, 2009 in the former "Ehrenhalle" - Photo Wilfried Petzi

A neuralgic place
About the history of the former “Ehrenhalle” 

Though Paul Ludwig Troost had planned the central “Ehrenhalle” (Hall of Honor) for setting up large-scale sculptures and carrying out festivities with artists, between 1937 and 1944, the place was used exclusively for opening exhibitions and holding press conferences. Every year, the National Socialists would gather in the “Ehrenhalle” for the “Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung,” [Great German Art Exhibition] and it was here that Hitler called for a “merciless war of annihilation” against modern art. He is the one who determined that as a representative reception hall, the plinths and the wall and pillar covering of the three-nave sky-lit hall should be clad in blood-red marble from Lake Tegern.  The omnipresence of the color red, which is so prominent on the Nazi party’s swastika flag, aimed at conjuring the ubiquity of the National Socialist world view.
In the 1950s, the building was considered “denazified” following the arrival of modern art, and renovations were undertaken aimed at covering up the unpleasant heritage. It was with this in mind that a competition was announced in 1956 between the Munich architects Josef Wiedemann, Ernst Hürlimann and Max Ott. Wiedemann, who won the bid, had conceived a very sparing and highly symbolic solution: “neutralization” using white. The red marble covering of the pillars and door frames were painted over in white, new walls and ceilings ­­– and in some parts curtains of white muslin – transformed the monumental hall into a multifunctional space. 
In 2003, these later alterations were reversed bit by bit as part of the “Critical Reconstruction” in order to open a view onto the building’s origins and allow for a proactive discussion of the space and its history. Ever since, the central middle nave has also been used as an exhibition and experimental space for contemporary artists like Aernout Mik, Paul McCarthy or Ai Weiwei. Since 2012 the room has served as the venue for DER ÖFFENTLICHKEIT – VON DEN FREUNDEN HAUS DER KUNST, an annually-rotating work by a contemporary artist commissioned by Haus der Kunst.

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